A single atom layer of gold: Researchers create goldene

For the first time, scientists have managed to create sheets of gold only a single atom layer thick. The material has been termed goldene. According to researchers from Linköping University, Sweden, this has given the gold new properties that can make it suitable for use in applications such as carbon dioxide conversion, hydrogen production, and…

Quantum electronics: Charge travels like light in bilayer graphene

An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has demonstrated experimentally that electrons in naturally occurring double-layer graphene move like particles without any mass, in the same way that light travels. Furthermore, they have shown that the current can be “switched” on and off, which has potential for developing tiny, energy-efficient transistors –…

New technique lets scientists create resistance-free electron channels

An international research team led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has taken the first atomic-resolution images and demonstrated electrical control of a chiral interface state — an exotic quantum phenomenon that could help researchers advance quantum computing and energy-efficient electronics. The chiral interface state is a conducting channel that allows electrons to travel…

Chemistry researchers modify solar technology to produce a less harmful greenhouse gas

Researchers in the UNC-Chapel Hill Chemistry Department are using semiconductors to harvest and convert the sun’s energy into high-energy compounds that have the potential to produce environmentally friendly fuels. In the paper, “Methyl Termination of p-Type Silicon Enables Selective Photoelectrochemical CO2 Reduction by a Molecular Ruthenium Catalyst,” published in ACS Energy Letters, the researchers explain…

Quantum interference could lead to smaller, faster, and more energy-efficient transistors

An international team of researchers from Queen Mary University of London, the University of Oxford, Lancaster University, and the University of Waterloo have developed a new single-molecule transistor that uses quantum interference to control the flow of electrons. The transistor, which is described in a paper published in the Nature Nanotechnology, opens new possibilities for…

Bioelectronic mesh capable of growing with cardiac tissues for comprehensive heart monitoring

A team of engineers led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst and including colleagues from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) recently announced in the journal Nature Communications that they had successfully built a tissue-like bioelectronic mesh system integrated with an array of atom-thin graphene sensors that can simultaneously measure both the electrical signal and…

A new world of 2D material is opening up

Materials that are incredibly thin, only a few atoms thick, exhibit unique properties that make them appealing for energy storage, catalysis and water purification. Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have now developed a method that enables the synthesis of hundreds of new 2D materials. Their study has been published in the journal Science. Since the…

Spiral wrappers switch nanotubes from conductors to semiconductors and back

It might look like a roll of chicken wire, but this tiny cylinder of carbon atoms — too small to see with the naked eye — could one day be used for making electronic devices ranging from night vision goggles and motion detectors to more efficient solar cells, thanks to techniques developed by researchers at…

Quantum films on plastic

A research team from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and the University of Salerno in Italy has discovered that thin films of elemental bismuth exhibit the so-called non-linear Hall effect, which could be applied in technologies for the controlled use of terahertz high-frequency signals on electronic chips. Bismuth combines several advantageous properties not found in other…

Using light to precisely control single-molecule devices

In a new Nature Communications study, Columbia Engineering researchers report that they have built highly conductive, tunable single-molecule devices in which the molecule is attached to leads by using direct metal-metal contacts. Their novel approach uses light to control the electronic properties of the devices and opens the door to broader use of metal-metal contacts…

Umbrella for atoms: The first protective layer for 2D quantum materials

The race to create increasingly faster and more powerful computer chips continues as transistors, their fundamental components, shrink to ever smaller and more compact sizes. In a few years, these transistors will measure just a few atoms across — by which point, the miniaturization of the silicon technology currently used will have reached its physical…

Graphene research: Numerous products, no acute dangers found by study

Think big. Despite its research topic, this could well be the motto of the Graphene Flagship, which was launched in 2013: With an overall budget of one billion Euros, it was Europe’s largest research initiative to date, alongside the Human Brain Flagship, which was launched at the same time. The same applies to the review…

CNTs, Nanowires, Conductive Inks & Nanomaterials – Sono-Tek

Uniform thin film layers of functional nanomaterials Sono-Tek ultrasonic nanomaterial coating systems are uniquely suited to spraying nanosuspensions like CNTs, nanowires, perovskite, graphene, and others.  Due to the inherent ultrasonic vibrations of the nozzle the energy breaks apart agglomerated particles in the suspension the liquid subjected to continuous mechanical vibrations during the entire coating process…

Two-dimensional waveguides discovered

The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), in collaboration with Kansas State University, announce the discovery of slab waveguides based on the two-dimensional material hexagonal boron nitride. This milestone has been reported in the journal Advanced Materials. Two-dimensional (2D) materials are a class of materials which can be reduced to the monolayer limit by mechanically peeling…

Electrons become fractions of themselves in graphene

The electron is the basic unit of electricity, as it carries a single negative charge. This is what we’re taught in high school physics, and it is overwhelmingly the case in most materials in nature. But in very special states of matter, electrons can splinter into fractions of their whole. This phenomenon, known as “fractional…

First human trial shows ‘wonder’ material can be developed safely

A revolutionary nanomaterial with huge potential to tackle multiple global challenges could be developed further without acute risk to human health, research suggests. Carefully controlled inhalation of a specific type of graphene — the world’s thinnest, super strong and super flexible material — has no short-term adverse effects on lung or cardiovascular function, the study…

New non-toxic method for producing high-quality graphene oxide

Researchers from Umeå have found a new way to synthesize graphene oxide which has significantly fewer defects compared to materials produced by most common method. Similarly good graphene oxide could be synthesized previously only using rather dangerous method involving extremely toxic fuming nitric acid. Graphene oxide is often used to produce graphene by removing oxygen.…

Fresh meat: New biosensor accurately and efficiently determines meat freshness

The freshness of animal meat is an essential property determining its quality and safety. With advanced technology capable of preserving food for extended periods of time, meat can be shipped around the globe and consumed long after an animal dies. As global meat consumption rates increase, so too does the demand for effective measures for…

Coppercoat Antifoul – Environmentally Responsible Bottom Paint

Classified as non-leaching, this highly effective coating is considerably kinder to the environment than conventional self-eroding anti-fouls. The complete treatment has been tested and approved by the Health and Safety Executive, in compliance with UK and EU law. Holding HSE Certificate Number 7532 Coppercoat is fully approved for use by both professional tradesmen and the general public. Coppercoat is…

Sensors made from ‘frozen smoke’ can detect toxic formaldehyde in homes and offices

Researchers have developed a sensor made from ‘frozen smoke’ that uses artificial intelligence techniques to detect formaldehyde in real time at concentrations as low as eight parts per billion, far beyond the sensitivity of most indoor air quality sensors. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, developed sensors made from highly porous materials known as…

New adhesive tape picks up and sticks down 2D materials as easily as child’s play

Materials just atoms in thickness, known as two-dimensional (2D) materials, are set to revolutionize future technology, including in the electronics industry. However, commercialization of devices that contain 2D materials has faced challenges due to the difficulty in transferring these extremely thin materials from where they are made onto the device. Now, a research team from…